HVAC Career Information

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Most people don’t like to pile on hats, coats, socks and other clothes just to stay warm indoors in the winter or to turn to a fan and iced drinks to build a cool summer climate. This is the why they have heating and air conditioning systems in their homes and businesses, and why technicians and contractors may find an HVAC career busy and demanding. HVAC technicians help to install, care for, and repair heating and air-conditioning systems units and also work with ventilation and refrigeration systems in residential and commercial properties.For many different reasons, they will find the HVAC field is growing.

New regulations are requiring homes to be more energy-efficient and those in HVAC careers need to have more technical skills to understand these new systems. For example, some homeowners now opt for two-stage furnace systems that create more balanced heating and lead to improved energy efficiency. Following the Great Recession, homeowners may also be more interested in savings and invest in better equipment up front to be able to save on costs in the future. The U.S Bureau of Labor Statistics notes the need for HVAC technicians will grow due to a construction industry that is recovering from the recent recession will require the skills of HVAC technicians and contractors in building new homes, homes built between 2002 and 2006 will start needing their HVAC systems replaced since most systems last between 10 to 15 years, and finally an emphasis on pollution reduction will lead to the retrofitting of equipment and systems so that they are energy efficient and no longer use prohibited refrigerants.

HVAC Career Outlook

chart Heating, Air Conditioning, and Refrigeration Mechanics and Installers (BLS, 2014)

Predictions stemming from 2014 data shows that jobs for HVAC mechanics and installers are expected to grow by 14% through the year 2024, which is much faster than the average for all professions (just 11%). This means nearly 40,000 new jobs over that span of a decade.

Using the same data, the BLS says that the average HVAC technician will earn about $44,630 annually, which works out to $21.46 an hour. Of course, average salaries do not tend to represent what a new HVAC technician can expect to make. According to Payscale, entry level HVAC technicians can expect to make around $15.35 per hour. Learning skills that include controls and commercial application can help technicians to earn more, faster.

The region in which an HVAC technician is employed can have a major impact both on how many jobs are available as well as how much the technician could make. Using the BLS average, which includes most HVAC professions, the top employment areas in the U.S. include:

  • Florida, with 23,660 jobs
  • Texas, with 20,870 jobs
  • California, with 19,660 jobs
  • New York, with 12,950 jobs
  • Pennsylvania, with 12,360 jobs

 

Unfortunately, the top paying states for HVAC technicians have minimal overlap with where technicians can expect to find the highest employment levels:

  • Alaska, $30.43 per hour
  • District of Columbia, $30.06 per hour
  • New Jersey, $27.11 per hour
  • Massachusetts, $26.85 per hour
  • Washington, $26.81 per hour

Keep reading for data on more specialized careers.

HVAC Career Details

Students can build HVAC careers by attending programs available at post secondary schools and working toward a diploma, certificate or associate degree. Apprenticeships under a licensed HVAC professional are another way to learn on-the-job skills. Education, time on the job, or a combination of the two provide ways for students to prepare for one of the many HVAC careers and seek employment with a company or eventually work as a licensed contractor. Below we list four specific HVAC careers.

AC Technician

AC Technician

Professionals known as AC technicians ensure that the temperature in a controlled climate is just where it needs to be. Their work often occurs in homes and businesses, but they also make sure that temperatures are spot on in places such as hospitals and grocery stores. They may have regular 9-to-5 hours but also be on call for when systems in homes and businesses go out or are in need of emergency repair.

HVAC Installer

HVAC Installer

HVAC installation is the process of putting heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems into residential and commercial properties. HVAC installers need to have mechanical skills and be manually dexterous to put these systems into place. They should be physically strong, capable of troubleshooting, and know how to manage their time since they may have more than one site where they work.

HVAC Mechanic

HVAC Mechanic

Think about your ideal day. Maybe it is relaxing poolside in a beautiful tropical retreat and then retiring to a luxury hotel room for a mid-afternoon siesta. Or perhaps it is whooshing down an Alpine ski run while the sun is out and then spending the evening curled up by a fireplace with hot cocoa. These scenarios are very different but have something in common: after a day in the sun, you get to go inside where it is comfortable and dry. And that would not be possible with HVAC mechanics.

HVAC Technician

HVAC Technician

HVAC technicians work in the installation, maintenance and repair of heating, air conditioning, and ventilation systems. They may specialize in specific areas, such as refrigeration systems, and seek certifications to reflect their expertise. They can work for a company or, after obtaining a license if it is required in their state, do contract work on their own. With time and experience on the job, they could move into a supervisory position for acompany.

Refrigeration Technician

Refrigeration Technician

A refrigeration technician cares for the refrigeration and cooling systems in a home or place of business, such as a restaurant kitchen, grocery store, or a home that is under construction. They know how to install and repair these systems and may be tasked with doing upgrades, replacing parts or working with new units. Refrigeration technicians are usually familiar with many different kinds of systems, and know how to read schematics.

Source URls

Barry Franklin

Barry is the Editor in Chief of HVACClasses.org, operated by educational web publisher Sechel Ventures, which he joined as partner in 2013 after almost 20 years in the financial software industry.